Many hospital patients may be unnecessarily tested, and treated, for catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs), according to a study published November 17 in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

Everyone, from healthcare providers to patients, have a role to play in reducing antibiotic resistance. Specifically,  in order to halt the alarming trend of antibiotic resistance there is a need for well-documented and properly coordinated strategies like stewardship of antibiotics, expanded surveillance of antibiotic resistance bacteria, and investments in new drug development and diagnostic testing across all healthcare settings. 

A global outbreak of Mycobacterium chimaera, an invasive, slow-growing bacterium, is linked to heater-cooler devices (HCD) used in cardiac surgery, according to a study published November 14 in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

It is virtually impossible to remove all contamination from robotic surgical instruments, even after multiple cleanings, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. The results show that complete removal of surface contaminants from these tools may be unattainable, even after following manufacturers’ cleansing instructions, leaving patients at risk for surgical site infections.

Ultraviolet C light disinfection to clean unoccupied patient rooms significantly reduced C. difficile infections (CDI) in high-risk patients who later occupied those rooms, according to a study published today inInfection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) applauds the General Assembly of the United Nations for convening the High-level Meeting on Antimicrobial Resistance today in New York.  SHEA remains a committed partner to addressing this significant public health challenge through programs and conferences that encourage international learning and collaboration. Keith Kaye, MD, MPH, SHEA vice president, will participate in the one-day meeting to add to the dialogue, as an infectious diseases clinician and researcher at an academic healthcare system in the United States.

Heat exchangers installed in a hospital to conserve energy promoted growth of Legionella pneumophila (Lp) in the hot water supply, according to a new study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

Household transmission of Clostridium difficile to pets and children may be a source of community-associated C. difficile infections according to findings from a new study published in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. The study found that patients with this bacteria can colonize or infect household contacts following or during treatment for an infection.

A new study found that following basic hygienic practices and complying with protocols for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) decolonization reduces the time to clearance of the bacteria more quickly than a treatment regimen of antibiotic ointment and antiseptic body wash.

Three key factors increase the risk for patient-to-patient transmission of an extremely drug-resistant bacteria known as CP-CRE, according to a new study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. The research helps explain why some contacts of an infected patient acquire the dangerous bacteria while others do not.

Bellevue, WA  July 7, 2016 – A new online training course for handlers of therapy animals that visit healthcare settings has received the endorsement of the infection prevention medical organization, The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA). SHEA recommends all animal handlers in healthcare settings participate in a formal training program to address zoonotic diseases and proper hygiene, as defined in the SHEA expert guidance, “Animals in healthcare facilities: recommendations to minimize potential risks.” The guidance addresses the increased presence of animals in acute care hospitals and ambulatory medical settings related to animal-assisted therapy, animal-assisted activities, and research in the context of patient and healthcare provider safety.

Infection prevention bundles, a package of evidence-based guidelines implemented in unison, are effective for reducing central line-associated blood stream infections (CLABSI) in critical care newborn infants, according to a new study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. The bundle helped reduce the number of lines placed, the duration of time used and the number of infections.

Today the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released new data on the frequency, location, and source of recent Legionnaires’ disease outbreaks and information on proper water management programs for buildings, including healthcare facilities. The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) applauds the CDC’s efforts to protect patients from this dangerous pathogen.

Preauthorization of broad-spectrum antibiotics and prospective review after two or three days of treatment should form the cornerstone of antibiotic stewardship programs to ensure the right drug is prescribed at the right time for the right diagnosis. These are among the numerous recommendations included in new guidelines released by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) and published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases

New research demonstrates that the six-step hand-hygiene technique recommended by the World Health Organization is superior to a three-step method suggested by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in reducing bacteria on healthcare workers’ hands. The study was published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

Today, the Presidential Advisory Council on Combatting Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria (PACCARB) met and plans to release the report, “Initial Assessment of the National Action Plan for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria,” an in-depth analysis of federal efforts to date and recommendations for continuing national progress related to antibiotic resistance. This comprehensive report uses the assessment completed by the PACCARB work groups to set the stage for future coordinated initiatives by U.S. Federal Agencies and interested private sector partners.

Strong infection prevention practices are critical for healthcare institutions around the world.  The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) has announced its 2016 International Ambassador Program delegation.  This year’s delegation includes 18 outstanding individuals from six continents, all with extensive experience in healthcare epidemiology and infection prevention.

On March 3, 2016, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released significant new data showing a reduction in healthcare-associated infections (HAIs), but warning about the persistence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the United States. The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America, representing leaders in infection prevention and control, urges all healthcare facilities and healthcare systems to establish and fully fund robust infection-prevention programs to protect patients from the spread of these lethal pathogens.

New research highlights the robust presence of antibiotic stewardship practices in most Veterans Administration-affiliated facilities, manifested in both formal and informal policies. The study was published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

Long-term use antiseptic soap in bathing critically ill patients to prevent healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) did not cause high levels of resistance in bacteria on the patients’ skin, according to a new study published online in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA).