New research demonstrates that the six-step hand-hygiene technique recommended by the World Health Organization is superior to a three-step method suggested by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in reducing bacteria on healthcare workers’ hands. The study was published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

Today, the Presidential Advisory Council on Combatting Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria (PACCARB) met and plans to release the report, “Initial Assessment of the National Action Plan for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria,” an in-depth analysis of federal efforts to date and recommendations for continuing national progress related to antibiotic resistance. This comprehensive report uses the assessment completed by the PACCARB work groups to set the stage for future coordinated initiatives by U.S. Federal Agencies and interested private sector partners.

Strong infection prevention practices are critical for healthcare institutions around the world.  The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) has announced its 2016 International Ambassador Program delegation.  This year’s delegation includes 18 outstanding individuals from six continents, all with extensive experience in healthcare epidemiology and infection prevention.

On March 3, 2016, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released significant new data showing a reduction in healthcare-associated infections (HAIs), but warning about the persistence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the United States. The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America, representing leaders in infection prevention and control, urges all healthcare facilities and healthcare systems to establish and fully fund robust infection-prevention programs to protect patients from the spread of these lethal pathogens.

New research highlights the robust presence of antibiotic stewardship practices in most Veterans Administration-affiliated facilities, manifested in both formal and informal policies. The study was published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

Long-term use antiseptic soap in bathing critically ill patients to prevent healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) did not cause high levels of resistance in bacteria on the patients’ skin, according to a new study published online in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA).

The United States has sufficient capacity for treating another outbreak of the Ebola virus, but financial, staffing and resource challenges remain a hurdle for many hospitals and health systems attempting to maintain dedicated treatment centers for highly infectious diseases, according to new study released today. The research was published online in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA).

Patients have difficulty deciphering complex numeric data on healthcare-associated infections used by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to help consumers choose hospitals, according to a new study published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA).

Modern medicine is largely dependent on the efficacy of antibiotics and other antimicrobials.  Yet, the ability to treat infections successfully with antibiotics is hampered by resistance due to their overuse and misuse.  Well-documented and properly coordinated strategies like stewardship of antibiotics, expanded surveillance of antibiotic resistance, as well as investment in new drug development and diagnostic testing can work to reverse this alarming trend.  The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) is pleased to join the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and other partners in "Get Smart about Antibiotics Week" to raise awareness of strategies and programs to address antibiotic resistance.

Diabetic patients are at considerably increased risk for developing surgical site infections (SSIs) while undergoing most types of surgeries, compared to non-diabetic patients, according to a new study published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA).

The number of infections caused by highly antibiotic-resistant extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria is increasing in community hospitals, a setting in which most Americans receive care, according to a new study published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

Today the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), released a list of five practices to avoid for better infection prevention and control and safer care as part of the ABIM Foundation’s Choosing Wisely® campaign. The recommendations can support conversations between patients and physicians about what care is really necessary.

The incidence of the most common strain of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections has decreased in hospital-onset cases, but has failed to decline in the broader community, according to new research published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) is encouraged by a new report released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) outlining key elements of sustainable and effective antibiotic stewardship plans in long-term care settings. SHEA strongly believes that addressing antibiotic resistance across the healthcare continuum must include efforts geared towards improving antibiotic-prescribing practices through the creation of antibiotic stewardship programs improve patient care practices and make important strides in addressing the National Action Plan for Combating Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria.

Probiotics show no benefit for preventing or eliminating gastrointestinal colonization with drug-resistant organisms in patients in the intensive care unit compared to standard care, according to new research published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

No single genetic strain of the widespread Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) bacteria appears to be any more harmful than other strains, according to new research published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) supports all of the nation’s healthcare providers across the spectrum of healthcare stepping up coordinated efforts to curb improper use of antibiotics by practicing antibiotic stewardship. A new Vital Signs report released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) spotlights the issue of healthcare communities working together on antibiotic misuse and overuse to improve patient safety.

The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) thoroughly supports a new proposed rule released last week by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) which includes new requirements for all long-term care facilities to improve programs for infection prevention and control and establish antibiotic stewardship programs as a Condition of Participation in Medicare.

Proper laundering and handling are important in achieving and maintaining the hygienically-clean quality of healthcare fabrics and textiles delivered to the point of care, according to a new review that highlights evidence-based strategies to inhibit potentially serious contamination.  The review, based on findings and recommendations from peer-reviewed studies, as well as current standards and guidelines, is published online in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA).

Whole genome sequencing can quickly isolate the specific strain of bacteria causing an outbreak, identify the source of contamination, and enable rapid infection prevention to stop the spread of infection, according to a study published today. The findings, based on the examination of an outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an Australian neonatal unit, appear in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.