Author: SHEA
Date Published:9/16/2015 1:03:00 PM
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For Immediate Release: September 16, 2015
Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America
Contact: Tamara Moore / tmoore@gymr.com / 202-745-5114
Author contact: Kyle Popovich / kyle_popovich@rush.edu

Dominant Strain of Drug-Resistant MRSA Decreases in Hospital Settings But Persists in the Broader Community

NEW YORK (September 16, 2015) – The incidence of the most common strain of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections has decreased in hospital-onset cases, but has failed to decline in the broader community, according to new research published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

The USA 300 strain of MRSA, has become prevalent in both communities and healthcare institutions.  “In looking at risk factors for hospital or community-onset USA 300, current or former drug use was a strong predictor for acquiring this strain of bacteria,” according to  Kyle J. Popovich, MD, MS, the lead author of the study and Assistant Professor in the Section of Infectious Diseases, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago.

In the past 15 years, MRSA infections have evolved as the bacterium emerged as a significant pathogen in the community and hospitals in the U.S. Researchers studied 1,015 cases of Staphylococcus aureus bacterial bloodstream infections (BSI) over a six-year period at a Chicago “safety net” hospital. The study found that more than half of hospital-acquired cases were due to the USA 300 strain.

Recent national surveillance has suggested a decrease in the incidence of invasive hospital-acquired MRSA infections during the past decade, and researchers said their findings reaffirmed that observation in the Chicago region.

“Decreases in hospital-onset MRSA BSIs may be due to substantial efforts aimed to reduce healthcare-associated infection,” said Popovich. “Enhanced prevention efforts in the community for certain populations, such as those engaging in illicit drug use, may be necessary to further curb the spread of invasive MRSA infections.” 

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Yoona Rhee, Alla Aroutcheva, Bala Hota, Robert A. Weinstein, Kyle J. Popovich. “Evolving Epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia.” Web (September 16, 2015).

About ICHE
Published through a partnership between the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America and Cambridge University Press, Infection Control &  Hospital Epidemiology provides original, peer-reviewed scientific articles for anyone involved with an infection control or epidemiology program in a hospital or healthcare facility. ICHE is ranked 13th out of 158 journals in its discipline in the latest Web of Knowledge Journal Citation Reports from Thomson Reuters.

SHEA is a professional society representing physicians and other healthcare professionals around the world with expertise and passion in healthcare epidemiology, infection prevention, and antimicrobial stewardship. SHEA's mission is to prevent and control healthcare-associated infections, improve the use of antibiotics in healthcare settings, and advance the field of healthcare epidemiology. SHEA improves patient care and healthcare worker safety in all healthcare settings through the critical contributions of healthcare epidemiology and improved antibiotic use. The society leads this specialty by promoting science and research, advocating for effective policies, providing high-quality education and training, and developing appropriate guidelines and guidance in practice. Visit SHEA online at www.shea-online.org, www.facebook.com/SHEApreventingHAIs and @SHEA_Epi.

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